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1930's Hollywood showroom

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07 Mar 2019 15:39 - 07 Mar 2019 15:40 #36819 by johnmereness
Replied by johnmereness on topic 1930's Hollywood showroom
Notice the billboard on the Right is advertising the Pilot Ray accessory light - w/ Brown Derby the next door neighbor to Fuller Auburn Cord and KFAC - the car should be a 1929 LaSalle Opera Coupe given wheels and fender mounted parking lamps

JMM
Last edit: 07 Mar 2019 15:40 by johnmereness.

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16 Dec 2018 19:25 - 07 Mar 2019 15:41 #36142 by johnmereness
Replied by johnmereness on topic 1930's Hollywood showroom
Fuller Auburn Cord - 1936

JMM
Last edit: 07 Mar 2019 15:41 by johnmereness.

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08 Aug 2017 01:21 #33386 by LeifHemy
Replied by LeifHemy on topic 1930's Hollywood showroom
Definitely a blast from the past. I'm hoping to ride one of those someday. :)

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22 Jan 2017 18:59 #32317 by johnmereness
Replied by johnmereness on topic 1930's Hollywood showroom
Sidenote, on the Canon link it lists 227 and on the building it says 222, so 227 would be across the street.

JMM

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22 Jan 2017 18:56 #32316 by johnmereness
Replied by johnmereness on topic 1930's Hollywood showroom
Yes, the building exists on Wilshire

JMM

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19 Jan 2017 16:41 #32305 by acdnut
Replied by acdnut on topic 1930's Hollywood showroom
Did a Google map search with no lock on the San Francisco but the Canon one may be close, I cant see where any of these buildings survived.
www.google.com/maps/@34.0683962,-118.398...w!2e0!7i13312!8i6656

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18 Jan 2017 22:42 - 18 Jan 2017 22:45 #32297 by acdnut
Replied by acdnut on topic 1930's Hollywood showroom
hi, this is balin', somehow my old login does not work. I cant go to those locations but you could, the Canon Drive and Hollywood address should be good, I think the Hollywood it next to The Chinese theater. Maybe some member from the San Francisco could get pictures from the city. I had no Idea of the addresses except Wilshire, I just found this card by accident I saw the addresses I have been looking for. And the Figueroa St
building, if it still exists would be interesting.
Last edit: 18 Jan 2017 22:45 by acdnut.

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18 Jan 2017 21:57 #32296 by 1748 S
Replied by 1748 S on topic 1930's Hollywood showroom
Those are very neat documents from the past. Someday when I finish my Beverly I will drive to this grand old building and stage some pics if possible.

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18 Jan 2017 20:41 - 18 Jan 2017 20:51 #32295 by acdnut
Replied by acdnut on topic 1930's Hollywood showroom
List od all Fuller showrooms, this is balin' i cant log on the website so I made another account, but see if this works
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Last edit: 18 Jan 2017 20:51 by acdnut.

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29 Nov 2016 04:54 #31954 by mikespeed35
Replied by mikespeed35 on topic Re: 1930's Hollywood showroom
Notice speedster pulling away.
Cordially Mike

Mike Huffman

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28 Nov 2016 16:11 #31952 by RandyEma
Replied by RandyEma on topic Re: 1930's Hollywood showroom
Yes

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28 Nov 2016 13:34 #31951 by balinwire
Replied by balinwire on topic Re: 1930's Hollywood showroom

C.B Demille enjoying the California sunshine not to far from Wilshire Blvd. dealership.
This is the San Francisco dealership, notice the Auburn Fuller Co. signs on the windows, was there a connection between the northern and southern California dealerships?

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19 Dec 2015 16:14 #30731 by balinwire
Replied by balinwire on topic Re: 1930's Hollywood showroom
There are very few images of the dealership behind shrubs and wall in center of frame but this one must be it, the towers are missing so I am not sure of the date, claimed to be in the 1950's.
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15 Nov 2015 17:13 #30590 by johnmereness
Replied by johnmereness on topic Re: 1930's Hollywood showroom
That is a 1933 or 1934 Packard that is under the Coffee sign - something is blocking the view of the leading edge of the front fender - a 1933 is more "open" on the leading edge while a 1934 is more closed (ie more "modern").

JMM

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19 Oct 2015 02:14 #30444 by mikespeed35
Replied by mikespeed35 on topic Re: 1930's Hollywood showroom
No KO's either.
CORDially Mike

Mike Huffman

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  • landmark
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18 Oct 2015 20:28 #30440 by landmark
Replied by landmark on topic Re: 1930's Hollywood showroom

Tom_Parkinson wrote: Hi,

Is that an L-29 under the coffee shop sign? It sure has a far-forward front axle.

--Tom



Packard?

Was man besonders gerne tut,
ist selten ganz besonders gut

Wilhelm Busch

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18 Oct 2015 16:03 #30437 by Tom_Parkinson
Replied by Tom_Parkinson on topic Re: 1930's Hollywood showroom
Hi,

Is that an L-29 under the coffee shop sign? It sure has a far-forward front axle.

--Tom

With brakes, two cylinders are better than one.

Editor-in-Chief Emeritus, The Hardtop News Magazine, the Journal of the Michiana Dunes Region, Lambda Car Club International

See pix of 1509A here: mbcurl.me/YCSE

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18 Oct 2015 13:13 #30436 by balinwire
Replied by balinwire on topic Re: 1930's Hollywood showroom
interesting view of how busy the area around the ADC showroom on Wilshire was, seen upper left center under broadcast tower behind palms. This would be a rare view looking west. <!-- s:shock: --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_eek.gif" alt=":shock:" title="Shocked" /><!-- s:shock: -->

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14 Jul 2015 21:20 #29888 by 1748 S
Replied by 1748 S on topic Re: 1930's Hollywood showroom
This sure is a beautiful example of a Beverly supercharged sedan.

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12 Jul 2015 12:02 #29865 by balinwire
Replied by balinwire on topic Re: 1930's Hollywood showroom
This 9x10 image was in a bunch of photos I have and it occurred to me it may be the west wall of the Fuller building parking lot.
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29 Jan 2015 18:58 #29059 by 1748 S
Replied by 1748 S on topic 1930's Hollywood showroom
What a great interesting story. I have been to these locations but had no idea what they were part of. Now I understand why I felt being drawn to the Brown Derby and the ACD building. Funny how that works. Thanks for all this great history of old L.A.

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20 Sep 2014 18:41 #28213 by balinwire
Replied by balinwire on topic 1930's Hollywood showroom
If you were standing on the curb front of the ACD dealership on Wilshire looking south across the street you would see this view of the famous Ambassador Hotel.
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24 Mar 2014 11:32 #27259 by balinwire
Replied by balinwire on topic 1930's Hollywood showroom
Another interesting view of the Fuller Building. Notice the antenna logo. Showroom sign.
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16 Jan 2014 16:56 #26673 by balinwire
Replied by balinwire on topic 1930's Hollywood showroom
in the twenties? showroom would have been where house is. No air pollution, clear sky.
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later in the fifties? radio tower gone, ACD cars long gone. Ambassador still on left. White building in center, next to church former showroom. Rare photo angle.
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02 Oct 2013 11:23 #26013 by balinwire
Replied by balinwire on topic 1930's Hollywood showroom
you can just see the KLAC letters on the right side of the Fuller building on Wilshire going west in 1939

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31 Aug 2013 19:41 #25837 by balinwire
Replied by balinwire on topic 1930's Hollywood showroom
You guys may know better but I think Cliff Henderson and E.L. had some sort of partnership in the Pan Pacific that was near the LA ACD dealership showrooms where the Cord debuted in 1935? Here is a picture noted, Crowds arrive for the silver jubilee auto show, held in October 1937 at the Pan-Pacific Auditorium.
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14 Oct 2012 22:04 #23716 by johnmereness
Replied by johnmereness on topic 1930's Hollywood showroom
Actually Great cars parked out front. The foremost car is a 1931 Cadillac 355 V-8 Town Sedan - it is in pretty base model trim with rear mount spare and wood wheels. The Ford Model A's are also nice body styles as well.

JMM

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14 Oct 2012 02:22 #23713 by balinwire
Replied by balinwire on topic 1930's Hollywood showroom
The original Hillcrest Motor Co. and Auburn Cord dealerships on the 200 block of North Canon Drive, on the east side of the street, 1931.

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14 Sep 2011 17:24 #20960 by balinwire
Replied by balinwire on topic KFAC defunct
It brodcasted at 1330 KHZ.

In 1945, the station's owner, E.L. Cord (the F.A.C. in the station's call letters stood for "Fuller Auburn Cord", the Auburn Cord &amp; Duesenberg dealer in the Los Angeles area, and western region headquarters for the Auburn Automobile Co. The transmitter was located on the roof of the building), was touring the station when he saw for the first time the huge collection of discs (a full symphony might take up twelve 78 rpm discs) KFAC owned. Cord decided to make better use of this investment by switching to all-classical music. Management tested the waters on this idea by asking the audience if they wanted another nighttime program, "Lucky Lager Dance Time" (which played pop and swing tunes) to continue or if they would prefer more classical. Classical won by a slim margin.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/KFAC_ (defunct )

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14 Sep 2011 17:13 #20958 by balinwire
Replied by balinwire on topic 1930's Hollywood showroom
Thanks Josh, I could have sworn it was KLAC. It must have also changed the prefix, was the AM transmitted frequency the same,570 KFAC? I think it may just go by FOX now.
www.am570radio.com/main.html

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  • Josh Malks
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14 Sep 2011 16:59 #20957 by Josh Malks
Replied by Josh Malks on topic 1930's Hollywood showroom
"K" is the prefix on radio stations west of the Mississippi. ("W" in the east.) So after the K the call letters stood for "Fuller Auburn Cord".

Josh B. Malks
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Check out CORD COMPLETE at www.cordcomplete.com

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14 Sep 2011 15:07 #20955 by balinwire
Replied by balinwire on topic 1930's Hollywood showroom
View looking east. KFAC painted over AuBURN CORD sign.

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13 Sep 2011 19:41 #20945 by balinwire
Replied by balinwire on topic 1930's Hollywood showroom
Dealer closing so AUBURN letters have been removed from the towers and all that remains is KFAC. AC for Auburn Cord. The palms have grown above the roof line. Directly across Wilshire was the Ambassador Hotel where Robert Kennedy was slain.

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13 Sep 2011 02:40 #20933 by balinwire
Replied by balinwire on topic 1930's Hollywood showroom
This market was not to far from the dealership in that timeframe. There is a sedan that may have been serviced at that dealership.

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13 Sep 2011 01:58 #20932 by Chris Summers
Replied by Chris Summers on topic 1930's Hollywood showroom
That would be one of the legendary Brown Derby restaurants.

Chris Summers
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So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past.

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12 Sep 2011 23:56 #20928 by balinwire
Replied by balinwire on topic west view 1940's?
Look closely at the antenna letters, sign to left of eat in the hat, CORD.

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12 Mar 2011 19:38 #19524 by balinwire
Replied by balinwire on topic 1930's Hollywood showroom
I came across these and posted them before I forgot, vacant lot

I dont think this one has been posted before?

this is how I remember it

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26 Feb 2011 03:32 #19391 by Ohio AMX
Replied by Ohio AMX on topic Re: Pan Pacific Building fire

Tom_Parkinson wrote: Hi,

I am uploading a photo of the fire that destoyed this beautiful wood-construction Art Deco building. Although it had fallen into bad decay, its destruction remains a great cultural loss.

When I see those (pre-fire) horizontal lines of windows and trim, what I think of is, "CORD!"



--Tom

Because the Pan-Pacific building was used in the 1980 movie Xanadu you can Google "Xanadu building" to get more info on the two fires that destroyed it and what has become of the site since then.

Scott Campbell
Medina, OH

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25 Feb 2011 16:03 #19388 by memaerobilia
Replied by memaerobilia on topic 1930's Hollywood showroom
Randy;
No surprise that once the wooden roof started to deteriorate from age, that renovation costs might be impractical. I've been reading through all this material, and it is amazing what could be done in those days. The Pan Pacific Auditorium (there were a whole range of OTHER major buildings in the Pan Pacific Village complex, such as the bowling alley, theater, ice rink arena etc etc) was constructed in 1000 hours! Only six weeks time from breaking ground to ready to open for the first Exhibition in 1935! At roughly 110,000 sq ft, it was the third largest auditorium in U.S. It was booked solid, for years, and most of the basketball games, hockey games, Ice Follies etc were sold out events. Two of the (Many) Annual events were the Automobile Show and the Aircraft & Boat Show. I have a whole album of 8 x 10 professional photographs of the Aircraft and Boat Show. Alas, I do not see a similar album for any of the Auto shows.. Here is a circa 1940 image from one of the Auditorium's brochures. (There is even a 1943 Original UNCASHED! check in the PP Auditorium files, for $1000! Fun stuff!) But cannot find Cord info?yet..

Joe G.
hundreds of our early photos or planes, racecars, customs classics @ www.memaerobilia.com

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23 Feb 2011 02:21 #19361 by RandyEma
Replied by RandyEma on topic 1930's Hollywood showroom
Joe. I visited with Charles Cord several times and the family owned the Pan Pacific during all those years of visits . One thing I remember Charles telling me was it was cost more for a new roof which was shot than the property was worth at the time. I think it was around 1938 that Cord bought contoling intrest in it. Randy

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22 Feb 2011 17:20 #19354 by memaerobilia
Replied by memaerobilia on topic 1930's Hollywood showroom
Anyone know E.L.Cord's exact title, in relation to his ownership of The Pan-Pacific Auditorium? The Henderson Brothers, Cliff and Phil (who also ran the huge National Air Races, numerous other auto and aviation events, basketball games, Ice Capades, even major planning roles in the Los Angeles Olympics, and many other Extravaganzas.) had the Pan-Pacific Village, including the Pan-Pacific Auditorium, designed. They had it built in 1935, and it was reported sold to E.L. Cord in 1937. I have several cartons of Cliff Henderson's original archives, full of original Pan-Pacific design photos, and financial reports (It generated hundreds of thousands of dollars profit, during the Depression) But in the reports, photos and programs for all these major events held there, there is usualy at least a full page with the "views" of Pan Pacific Auditorium Prorgrams with Cliff as President and Managing Director, and Phil as Vice President and Business Manager, all the way through the forties. So is it safe to assume that Cord was jut the "owner" and had no "active" role in the auditorium? Cliff has "E.L. Cord" as one of the listees in his personal phone book/directory, as early as a dated page for November 1930. Cliff Henderson owned or used (or had promotional loan of) at LEAST 20 different magnificent Cords and Auburns, using them extensively for his personal use, or as V.I.P. vehicles and parade cars for many of the earlier years of the 1929-1939 National Air Races. A couple of 8 x 10 photos show groups of three-four open Cords &amp; Auburns together in parades, and possibly MORE in the backgrounds.From L-29s, to various open Cords and special Auburn Speedsters, with famous air racers, especially the rare photos of the Cords with famous Women pilots and air race winners. Sometimes called "The Master of Ballyhoo" he had professional photographic records and press releases of many of these Cords and Auburns at the races with such as Mary Pickford, Governors etc etc. *They even had novelty races of "mini" Auburns, at the National Air Race events. He said it took a combined effort of 7000 people to put on the national Air Races, and a healthy proportion of the prize money and support services came from ALL of the big names in the oil companies of the time. so LOTS of great photos of the various Oil Company fuel trucks servicing not only the race planes, but "Giving the Cord a drink." too. The original 80 year old photos are so sharp that one can read the license plates easily, on many of them, which greatly helps with dating them!
But it would appear that Cord left all Pan-Pacific Auditorium matters in the very capable hands of the Henderson Brothers. Still have more boxes to go through. Acquired 400 lbs of Hendersons material, years ago.

Joe G.
hundreds of our early photos or planes, racecars, customs classics @ www.memaerobilia.com

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29 Dec 2010 23:50 #18931 by balinwire
Replied by balinwire on topic 1930's Hollywood showroom
I just saw this on a metal kiddy lunchbox.
The 1976 Star Wars landspeeder is a copy of the DiDia. Cord in the future.

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29 Dec 2010 22:43 #18930 by balinwire
Replied by balinwire on topic 1930's Hollywood showroom
Wow! That must have been a very enlightening visit.
To have these giants of design working in the same Auburn studio building cars.
At least we still have examples of their art to enjoy.
The only time I met anyone of that stature was completely by accident. I was called to the Santa Monica home of Dutch Darrin to do some work. We chatted all day about old cars and he told me of his whole life in styling.
He was also ill and when I returned at a later time I was greeted by his son with the news.
Anyway, I was listening to 1950's music, a change from the 1940's Horace Heidt, Harry James, Glenn Miller that sound so good around the old cars.
It got me to thinking of what the cars may have evolved into. Not so much the Duesenberg 1963 but a fifties version.
The song Dream Lover by Bobby Darin was playing.
He only lived to age 37. He bought the DiDia 150. Quote," Darin's car was built by Detroit native and clothing designer Andy DiDia; the car took seven years, from 1953 to 1960, to finish. Two engines are listed as power plants; I assume the present 427 came later. Originally the car cost $153,647.29 to create; today it's worth $1.5 million."
It has an instrument control cluster that looks as if it was inspired by the Cord 810 dash levers. Hidden headlights possibly inspired by the original Cord design <!-- s:?: --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_question.gif" alt=":?:" title="Question" /><!-- s:?: -->

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  • Josh Malks
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28 Dec 2010 04:13 #18925 by Josh Malks
Replied by Josh Malks on topic 1930's Hollywood showroom
Nope, never visited Tremulis's shop. Did visit with him and Chrissie at his home in Ventura. The last time he was deep in the throes of Alzheimer's.

Very talented designer, very talented crafsman, very talented storyteller.

Josh B. Malks
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Check out CORD COMPLETE at www.cordcomplete.com

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27 Dec 2010 23:27 #18923 by balinwire
Replied by balinwire on topic 1930's Hollywood showroom
The fast back four door sedan used to appeal to me, but as I get older I prefer the four doors and the larger trunk. I cant even see it anymore. I guess thats why ice cream comes in two flavors.

Hi Josh, question, I saw mention of his shop here, wmspear.com/bill/Bantam/40hly.html
did you ever get to see Tremulis' Beverly Hills shop and did you ever get to meet and interview him?

< Tremulis, Alexander Sarantos b. January 23, 1914 d. December 29, 1991>



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25 Dec 2010 16:03 #18910 by Tom_Parkinson
Replied by Tom_Parkinson on topic Bustle-back?
Hi,

I know this is all opinion and personal preference, but to me the flat back is the greatly better styling. It's the [i:lhegtdw5]flat-back [/i:lhegtdw5]that was born on the highway...



Anyway, who cares about minor issues such trunk space and convenience when you have a [i:lhegtdw5]CORD??[/i:lhegtdw5] :)

--Tom

With brakes, two cylinders are better than one.

Editor-in-Chief Emeritus, The Hardtop News Magazine, the Journal of the Michiana Dunes Region, Lambda Car Club International

See pix of 1509A here: mbcurl.me/YCSE

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24 Dec 2010 21:00 #18895 by balinwire
Replied by balinwire on topic 1930's Hollywood showroom
Compared to the original Buehrig styling vision, it is an addition, but as an addition it is not an abomination as it could have been. The stock body?s were converted to ambulances and such. Had the company survived many models have come in other designs from the cowl back. I actually feel it is very attractive and well done in the light of 1937 styling. Usually different is better in the old car world and the bustle never seems to have endeared itself as a styling cue. They seem to have be the first body?s cannibalized, scrapped and ignored. The Tremlus connection is very forgiving as well. Not sporty but classy and very impressive to the untrained eye of doorman at the Copa.


www.conceptcarz.com/vehicle/body ... carID=9090



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24 Dec 2010 21:00 #18894 by Chris Summers
Replied by Chris Summers on topic 1930's Hollywood showroom
I sometimes think I'm the only person who likes the bustlebacks (or humpbacks, as I usually accidentally call them). It comes from favoring Custom models, I think.

Chris Summers
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So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past.

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24 Dec 2010 20:13 #18892 by Josh Malks
Replied by Josh Malks on topic 1930's Hollywood showroom
This a probably a 1937 812, not an 810. Lots of photos indicate that the bumper guards on the 812s were installed pointing down.

The taillites had to be outboard in order for the rear spare to work. All 812 bustlebacks and some later 812 fastbacks had outboard lites. Seems unlikely that the dealer would do the needed bodywork to move the lites from the deck lid. So either the rear spare was a factory installation or the dealer kit could only be installed on a fastback with outboard taillites. More likely the latter.

The bustle trunks were added to provide some luggage space. This was the major customer complaint (bodywise) about the fastback sedans. The bustle trunks were hardly an improvement esthetically, IMHO.

Josh B. Malks
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  • balinwire
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24 Dec 2010 19:34 #18891 by balinwire
Replied by balinwire on topic 1930's Hollywood showroom
Would you fair to say this was an 810 model in 1936? The tire carrier looks like it was well done. The trunk bracket looks like a gas filler neck attached to the trunk skin when the tire is lowered. Was there a good survival rate on these carriers on the sedans and how many still exist? The interior of the trunk seems muck larger without the spare. All the tire carrier parts appear to be bolt on.
A trunk or spare tires and side pipes on a luxury car in the thirties was a considered a special treat to view. Looking at the amount of cars from the thirties with hump trunks they seemed to be preferred by buyers.
The Cord bustle trunks that were designed after the accessory bolt on trunks and designed by Alex Tremulis creator of the Tucker seem to mimic a tire carrier.
Trunks must have been favored by buyers as it was popular with buyers of the 812 Beverly. Possibly inspired somehow by how well the spare was carried on this model.
I was pondering the question of reversing the bumperettes. Cord never considered the car in the rear view mirror. The Cord was the only car on the road. Now consider the car on an assembly line. The front bumper is 12". The rear would be slightly higher 14", especially in the 812 with the extra leaf. So if a Cord front bumper would bump a Cord rear bumper it would not travel underneath. Locking and possibly damaging the rear fairing and bending the spare wheel. So reverse the bumperettes preventing under travel? Fun to speculate. <!-- s:wink: --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_wink.gif" alt=":wink:" title="Wink" /><!-- s:wink: --> notice how the taillights are not in the lid... www.coachbuilt.com/des/t/tremulis/tremulis.htm

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